The pendulum swung the other way on the question of justified violence in last night’s good new episode of The Expanse. Featuring some nice action, suspense, problem solving, and a cameo from Adam Savage, it also occurred to me that for a show that’s not half as popular as The Walking Dead its special effects budget certainly seems a lot better, in that the effects actually support the story really well. I don’t know, maybe animating a tiger is a lot more expensive than what we saw last night.

Spoilers after the screenshot

I only just realised it was the season finale. It really didn’t feel like a season finale somehow. I guess that’s why Naomi (Dominique Tipper) had that montage narration at the end. I would rather have had Bobbie (Frankie Adams) saving Avasarala (Shohreh Aghdashloo) and Cotyar (Nick E. Tarabay) without the distance created between us and the scene by the narration. Still, it was all reasonably satisfying.

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The episode was written by the writers of the novels the show was based on, Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck (their collaborative pen name is James S.A. Corey), and veteran Star Trek writer Naren Shankar and I liked everyone brainstorming how to deal with the protomolecule soldier, that felt very Star Trek in a very good way. Amos (Wes Chatham) coming up with one solution and Prax (Terry Chen) coming up with another, better one after being inspired by his plants. That was right out of the old Star Trek: The Next Generation playbook.

Ever since I saw Samuel L. Jackson, in talking about Get Out, criticise the tendency to cast British actors over American actors under the belief that British actors are better trained, I have to admit . . . generally I’ve been noticing how the American actors aren’t as well trained. This doesn’t include exceptional performers like Thomas Jane, who I’m missing more and more, but the rank and file like Wes Chatham and Steven Strait. Aside from Aghdashloo, no-one on the show of any nationality has what might be called star quality but the British, Australian, and New Zealander actors seem to have a greater repertoire of facial expressions and vocal intonations to draw on. I guess with Amos it at least makes sense since he’s supposed be emotionally numb. But Nick E. Tarabay was particularly bad last night as Avasarala’s injured right hand man, Aghdashloo having to carry almost all the emotional weight of his possible betrayal with her reaction shots. She is equal to the task, though, more so than Steven Strait reacting to Dominque Tipper at the end. I can almost hear the actor thinking, “Do I switch on Good Holden or Evil Holden?”

Evil Holden seems to have more of a southern accent. I wonder if Steven Strait and Andrew Lincoln spent a lot of time watching De Niro in Scorsese’s remake of Cape Fear.

Before it got diluted by the narration at the end, I was really enjoying Bobbie’s segment, though, as much as I do like Frankie Adams, I wish she’d move more like a soldier. But considering all this show does manage to do maybe I shouldn’t quibble.